Oconaluftee Brown Trout:
This is a beautiful brown trout
that are common in this
stream. It's one of the best
brown trout stream in the park.
Oconaluftee River Watershed:
Fly Fishing the Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Description:
The Oconaluftee River is definetly one of the better trout streams in Great
Smoky Mountains National Park. The stream has just about the right amount
of gradient to it for the water to maintain a good flow, but yet not steep enough
to make it too turbulent. It's mostly the classic ripple, run, and pool type
freestone trout stream.

S
tream Size:
The portion of the stream above the confluence of the Bradley Fork is a
medium size trout stream in comparison with other Great Smoky Mountains
National Park streams. Downstream of the confluence of the Bradley Fork, the
Oconaluftee is a much larger stream. Much of this part of the stream is
surrounded by open meadows. This portion offers excellent fishing but for
some reason, is rarely fished. .

Accessibility:
Most all of the Oconaluftee, except its uppermost part, is accessible from
highway #441that crosses the park from North Carolina to Tennessee.
Popularity:   
Due to its proximity to many other North Carolina trout streams it's not heavily
fished even though it;s a very good stream that has excellent access for most
of its length.

Species:
This stream has a good population of brown trout as well as rainbows.  

Average Fish Size:
Although most of the trout are of average size, the stream does contain some
very nice ones.

Difficulty:
This stream has a very good coverage of overhanging tree limbs that helps
keep the water cool during the hot summer months. This makes casting in
most of it on the difficult side, but doing so can be very rewarding.

Tributary Streams:
The Oconaluftee River has two large tributary streams that flow into it before it
leaves the park.

Bradley Fork:
The tributary stream, Bradley Fork, is a fine trout stream that offers several
miles of fishing. It's easily accessed near its confluence with the Oconaluftee
River at the Smokemont campground. The Bradley Fork is about as large as
the Oconaluftee at this point. It becomes smaller upstream of the
campground but it's still a good size stream. It has an excellent population of
both brown and rainbow trout with brook trout in its upper waters.

The Bradley Fork has a relatively good sized tributary stream, Chasteen Creek.

Chasteen Creek:
This stream enters the Bradley Fork just over a mile upstream of the
campground. It is followed fairly closely by the Chasteen Creek Trail. A couple
of miles upstream is backcountry campsite #48. Chasteen Creek usually has
a good population of  rainbow trout.

Taywa Creek:
Upstream of Chasteen Creek is Taywa Creek, another small tributary stream
that usually has a good population of rainbow trout in its lower portion and
brook trout in its headwaters. Chasteen Creek Trail follows this stream
making access fairly easy in most places.

Chasm Prong:
Chasm Prong, along with the Gulf Prong, forms the Bradley Fork. It is a small
brook trout stream with no formal trail that follows it.

Gulf Prong:
Gulf Prong, along with Chasm Prong, forms the Bradley Fork. It's a small
brook trout stream and like Chasm Prong, it doesn't have a trail that follows it.
The stream must be fished from the streambed in a upstream direction.

Collins Creek:
Collins Creek enters the Oconaluftee River across the #441 highway from the
Collins Picnic Area. It's accessible from the picnic area. The stream has
mostly rainbow trout with a few browns.

Kephart Prong:
Rainbow trout make up the fish population in this small stream. The Kephart
Prong trail off highway #441offers access to this stream. It's a tributary of the
Oconaluftee River that together with Beech Flats Prong, forms the river.

Beech Flats Prong:
About three miles of Beech Flats Prong is accessible from highway #441, but
the stream is tough to get too. It's a tributary of the Oconaluftee River that
together with Kephart Prong, forms the river. The stream has rainbows and a
few brown trout with brook trout in its headwaters.

Kanati Branch:
Kanati Branch is a small brook trout tributary of Beech Flats Prong. It's also
accessible from highway #441near the Kephart Prong trail.

Comments:
Easy access, few anglers, excellent aquatic insect life (for a small mountain
freestone stream) and both rainbow and brown trout makes this a very good
choice. This is one of the best streams in the park.

Copyright 2011 James Marsh
The Oconaluftee River is
definitely one of the best trout
streams in the park.  
This is the Bradley Fork, a rather
large tributary stream that usually
has an excellent population of
brown and rainbow trout.
Brook Trout caught from Collins
Creek
It provides the perfect habitat
for the brown trout and has a
very good population.
The Oconaluftee River is one
of the most beautiful streams
in the park.
Small Oconaluftee River Brown Trout
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