12/12/10
Insects and other foods the trout may be eating:
1.    Blue-winged Olives
2  .  Sculpin, baitfish and small crayfish (Imitate with streamers)
3.    Midges

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Check Out the National Weather Forecast for the Nest Week at Gatlinburg
Winter Storm Warning...Wind Advisory....Hazadous Weather Outlook
Overnight: Rain. Low around 34. South wind around 10 mph. Chance of
precipitation is 100%.

Sunday: Rain before 7am, then rain and snow showers likely between 7am and
10am, then a chance of snow showers after 10am. Temperature falling to around 26
by 4pm. South wind around 15 mph becoming west. Winds could gust as high as 25
mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch
possible.

Sunday Night: Snow showers. Low around 18. Breezy, with a west wind between 15
and 20 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New
snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Monday: Snow showers likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 23. Breezy, with a
west wind between 15 and 20 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph. Chance of
precipitation is 70%.

Monday Night: A 30 percent chance of snow showers, mainly before 1am. Mostly
cloudy, with a low around 13. West wind between 5 and 15 mph, with gusts as high
as 25 mph.

Tuesday: A 20 percent chance of snow showers before 1pm. Partly sunny, with a
high near 27.

Tuesday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 13.

Wednesday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 39.

Wednesday Night: A chance of rain or freezing rain. Mostly cloudy, with a low
around 29. Chance of precipitation is 30%.

Thursday: A 40 percent chance of rain. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 47.

Thursday Night: A 30 percent chance of rain. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 35.

Friday: A 20 percent chance of rain. Partly sunny, with a high near 46.

Friday Night: A slight chance of rain and snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low
around 25. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Saturday: Partly sunny, with a high near 43.
I'll Bet anyone 50 cents that this forecast changes every few hours....

Part Eleven - Adult Midges
New Great Smoky Mountains National Park Trout Food Series

The adult midges can sometimes be spotted when the light just happens to hit the
water the right way, but ninety percent or more of the time, you want notice them
unless you make an effort to find them. One way is just to try to position the sunlight
on the water (moving around) to where it brightens the surface. Of course this is
impossible if there isn't any light. Another way is to wade and use a surface skim
net. That's what I usually do to find midge pupae and adults as well as any other
small insect that are hatching. The net I use wads up and stores in a small bag that
claps to my landing net handle. It opens up to spread over the landing net. It's just a
fine mesh net that you hold mostly in the water with the top part protruding out of
the water just enough to catch all the insects near the surface. What you find is  
sometimes amazing. You almost always find something, but you may come up with a
net full of midge adults and larvae when you have failed to see the first one on the
water. Anyone who has never tried to do this certainly should. Those that haven't
really just don't have a clue what can be drifting down a stream, especially if the
light is low or it's cloudy. You may even find some large spinners that are there that
would be as large as a hook size 14 or larger that you had no idea existed. I have
had that happen many times.

Back to the midges, just let me say that this is a great way to determine if a hatch is
occurring. If you fish tailwaters and don't skim the water with a surface net, you are
missing out on lots of information. Often you will catch adults you may think are
dead or cripples that didn't make it only to look at the net in a few minutes and find
out they are all gone or have flown away. The only other way I know to determine if
a hatch is underway or not, other than seeing them on the surface, or using the
surface skim net, is to watch for rise rings. This only works in very smooth water,
however, which means it isn't very effective in the Smokies. It can be on slick
tailwaters and spring creeks. You may see some in the pockets or the slow, slick
ends of pools in the Smokies.

Copyright 2010 James Marsh
The “Fly Fishing for Small Stream Brown Trout”
program was shot on small streams located from
the East to the Western Rocky Mountains. It is a fact
that most small freestone streams usually have
small fish including brown trout. This is especially
true of mountain headwater streams. None of them
have a reputation for holding big fish. However, what
makes brown trout big is food not necessarily the
size of the stream. The water chemistry of a stream
is what makes a big difference. Even though small
streams usually have small fish, there can be an
exception to this when it comes to the brown trout.
Even though the majority of brown trout found in
small streams are usually small, there always
seems to be a few fish that grow to a large size.
However, the fact that they are there certainly doesn’t
mean that you will catch them. Fly fishing for brown
trout can be challenging.