Hatches Made Easy:

Light Cahills (Stenacron interpunctatum ) - Nymphs and Emergers

03/12/08

Nymph: (Clingers)
Most of their life the flat like nymphs are like their name implies-clinging to rocks
and are not readily available to trout. They migrate to the slower moving, calmer
water nearby their fast water habitat when it is near the time for them to emerge.
As with most of the other clingers, I recommend fishing imitations of the nymph
only when the hatch is either about to begin or underway.

Presentation:
When you anticipate a hatch is about to begin or if you have determined it has
already started, you may want to try imitating the nymphs migrating from their
normal fast water habitat to slower, more moderately flowing water close by. If
the hatch has begun, you would want to do this in the mornings and early
afternoon up until the time the nymphs begin to emerge. Fish your imitation
heavily weighted, right on the bottom at the edges or seams of the fast moving
riffles and runs. Your basic approach should be focused on bringing the nymph
out of the fast water into the areas where the water is moving slower. An up
stream or up and across presentation works best for this.

Emerger:
The nymphs usually emerge just below the surface in the calmer, slower moving
water that is nearby the fast moving water they migrated from. They can begin to
hatch in the middle of the afternoon but most likely, it will be late in the day. On
clear, very warm days the hatch occurs very late, near sunset. The emerger
stage of the hatch is a short one. These nymphs change into a dun in a
relatively short time.

Presentation:
A wet fly imitation of the emerging nymph fished well below the surface may
produce but don’t always count on it. Floating nymphs or emergers with trailing
shucks may produce better results.
Emerger imitations usually work best if they are presented down and across on
the swing. I wouldn't suggest you spend a lot of time fishing the emerger
patterns if they are not producing results. You may be just as well off fishing an
imitation of the dun.

Coming Up Next:
Light Cahill - Duns and Spinners

Copyright 2008 James Marsh