Copyright 2013 James Marsh
05/08/13

Insects and other foods the trout
should be eating:
Hatching:
1.    BWOs (Little BWOs)
2.    Giant Black Stoneflies
3.    Light Cahills
4.    Cinnamon Caddis (mostly Abrams)
5.    Eastern Pale Evening Duns
6.    Little Short-horned Sedges
7.    American March Browns
8.    Eastern Green Drakes (Abrams)
9.    Little Yellow Stoneflies
Most available - Other types of food:
10.   Sculpin, Minnows (Streamers)
11.   Inch Worms



Fly Fishing Strategies - Which Flies To Use - Coming Week
In yesterday's article, I wrote that I would bet my favorite lucky charm the weather guys would be increasing
the chances of rain for this coming weekend. Well, it didn't take them but a day to do it. They have already
changed it from a 50% chance of rain to a 60% chance of rain for Saturday. It will probably be increased
more the closer we get to the weekend.

As I am writing this, early this Wednesday morning, it is raining in Pigeon Forge and over parts of the
Smokies. Hopefully, there won't be much to it. Little River is already down to 747 cfs. It's falling faster than I
anticipated. The Oconaluftee River and Cataloochee Creek are relatively higher and falling at about the
same rate. I have just about given up on being able to predict the conditions for the remainder of the week
and the weekend, but based on the latest long range forecast, it's fairly obvious the streams are going to
stay on the high side.

Last weekend, the streams were high and two of our Perfect Fly customers did very well under those
circumstances. I will be providing more pictures and information on fishing the high water in tomorrow's
fishing report.

Suggested strategy:
I'm basing the strategy on the larger streams being too high to safely wade. I don't see that I have much
choice in that regard.
Lets hope I am wrong. I would start out with a nymph or streamer, but the particular
fly I would use would depend on the type of stream I was fishing.

Larger streams with high water unsafe to wade:
If it was a lower or middle elevation stream, too high to safely wade, I would use a streamer that imitated a
sculpin, such as our Perfect Fly Black Matuka Sculpin. As soon as the light situation became bright, I would
change from the streamer to a double fly rig consisting of a dry fly large enough to support a  dropper
nymph, or a strike indicator and nymph rig. If it stayed cloudy and overcast, I would continue with the
streamer.

I do not like using double rigs or strike indicators at all. In most cases, they are purely a way for unskilled
anglers to increase their odds. The reason I'm suggesting it in this case is based on having to fish high, fast
water from the banks. The dropper or indicator rig would make it more practical and easier to fish under the
high water situation where wading isn't safe. I would drop a Light Cahill or Eastern Pale Evening Dun nymph.
Stick with it until something begins to hatch and then change to an emerger or dun fly pattern if it was a
mayfly, or pupa imitation, if it was a caddisfly.

Late in the afternoon, within an hour or two of sunset (early if cloudy or later if clear), watch for spinner falls.
If you see one taking place, or if you spot the spinners on the water, by all means switch to a spinner pattern
of that mayfly. It is also possible to see some caddisfly egg laying activity at that time. Most likely these would
be the Little Short Horned sedges. If so, switch to an adult imitation of that caddisfly. This is less likely to take
place than stonefly egg laying activity.

The stoneflies (Giant Blacks or Little Yellow Stoneflies) will not begin to emerge (crawl out of the water to
hatch) until it is very late in the day. If you see any stoneflies in mid-afternoon, they will be adults that
emerged during previous days. If they are dropping down and laying eggs on the water, you should fish an
adult imitation of the stonefly but that probably won't happen until late afternoon. It can happen earlier, but it
strictly depends on the light situation.

Unless the action on the dry mayfly dun was continuing, late in the day (5:00 to 7:00 PM) and depending on
the sky conditions, I  would switch to a Little Yellow stonefly nymph. These are hatching in most streams. If
you see several large, Giant Black Stoneflies, or their shucks, you may prefer to use a Giant Black Stonefly
nymph. I would fish the stonefly nymph until it was no longer legal to fish. If at any time late in the day, you
notice much stonefly egg laying activity, switch to an adult Little Yellow Stonefly.

Small streams that are wadable:
If I started out fishing a higher elevation, small stream, and most likely I would do just that, I would start out
using a Light Cahill nymph. The reason for that is there are more clinger nymphs that swimmers or crawlers
in the small, fast water streams. The Light Cahills should be the most plentiful clinger in the small streams. I
would fish that until I started to see something hatch. Most likely that would be Light Cahills or possibly
American March Browns. That would start to happen around 2:00 to 3:00 PM and If and when it did, I would
switch to an emerger or dun pattern of that mayfly.

I would stick with the dry fly mayfly dun until it was clear the hatch had ended. The other mayflies and
caddisflies shown on the above list don't hatch in the small, higher elevation fast water streams.

Late in the day, after the dry fly activity slows down and hatches subside, watch for spinner falls. If you see
one taking place, or spot the spinners on the water, by all means switch to a spinner pattern of that mayfly.
Again, in the small higher elevation streams, this most likely would be LIght Cahills or American March
Browns.

As mentioned above, the stoneflies (Giant Blacks or Little Yellow Stoneflies) will not begin to emerge (crawl
out of the water to hatch) until it is very late in the day. If you see any stoneflies in mid-afternoon, they will be
adults that emerged during previous days. If they are dropping down and laying eggs on the water, you
should fish an adult imitation of the stonefly but that probably won't happen until late afternoon. It can
happen earlier but it depends on the light situation.

Repeating the above larger stream situation, stoneflies won't begin to hatch until very late in the day. Unless
the action on the dry mayfly dun was continuing, late in the day (5:00 to 7:00 PM) and depending on the sky
conditions, I  would switch to a Little Yellow stonefly nymph. These are hatching in most streams, small and
large. If you see several large, Giant Black Stoneflies or their shucks, you may prefer to use a Giant Black
Stonefly nymph. I would fish the stonefly nymph until it was no longer legal to fish. If at any time late in the
day, you notice much stonefly egg laying activity, switch to an adult Little Yellow Stonefly.s
New Schedule of Daily
Articles
Mondays: Weather and Stream
Conditions Forecast - Coming Week
Tuesdays: Fly Fishing Strategies -
Which Flies To Use - Coming Week
Wednesday: Fishing Tales
Thursday: Smoky Mountains Fishing
Report
Friday: Getting Started
Saturday: Fly Fishing School
Sunday: This Week's Featured Trout
Food
More Options For Selecting Flies:
1.
Email us with the dates you will be
fishing the park and we will send
you a list of our fly suggestions.
Please allow up to 24 hours for a
response.

2. Call us at 800-594-4726 and we
will help you decide which flies you
need.

3. Call or email us with a budget for
flies and we will select them and get
them to you in time for your trip.

Shipping is free in the U. S. for all
orders of any size. Orders over $50
are shipped free via Priority Mail.
Below: "Perfect Fly" Light Cahill
nymph, dun and spinner  and bottom,
a Giant Black Stonefly Nymph