09/13/12

Insects and other foods the trout should be eating:
Hatching:
1.    BWOs (Little and Eastern BWOs)
2.    Little Yellow Quills
3.    Little Yellow Stoneflies
4.    Slate Drakes
5.    Needle Stoneflies
6.    Mahogany Duns

Most available/ Other types of food:
7.    Sculpin, Minnows (Streamers)
8.    Craneflies
9.    Beetles
10.  Grasshoppers
11.  Ants

Fly Presentation - Part 7

Presenting Emerging Nymphs or Pupae Imitations that are Swimming to the Surface – Up
and Across Current:
This method requires a weighted fly or leader, depending on the current and depth, sufficient
enough to get the fly down near the bottom fairly quickly. It is used to imitate a nymph or pupae
swimming to the surface to hatch. It works best where currents are moderate to fast.   

Cast upstream and across at about a 30 to 45 degree angle. Let the fly sink almost to the bottom.
If the fly and or leader is slack on weight, you may need to mend the line to help get the fly down.
You will have to judge this strictly by watching the amount of leader that goes below the surface of
the water.

Strip in the slack line created by the fly coming back downstream. Watch the point that the leader
enters the water for any movement that might indicate a strike or tightening of the line and set the
hook as soon as possible if you think a fish has taken the fly.

Presenting Emerging Nymphs or Pupae Imitations that are Swimming to the Surface –
Down and Across Current:
This method requires a weighted fly or leader, depending on the current and depth, sufficient
enough to get the fly down near the bottom fairly quickly. It is used to imitate a nymph or pupae
swimming to the surface to hatch.  It works best in moderate to slow moving currents.

Cast the fly straight across or slightly upstream in faster currents. Allow the fly to sink near the
bottom. Mend the line upstream or downstream as necessary to help get the fly down. Follow the
fly with the rod tip until the line is tight. At this point the fly will begin to rise to the surface due to the
current. Allow it to drift in the current near or at the surface for a few seconds before casting again.

Presenting Emerging Nymphs and Pupae Imitations Drifting in Shallow Water – Up and
Across:
Fishing a nymph or pupa in the surface film isn’t as easy as presenting a dry fly because you
cannot see the fly as well in order to keep track of it. This also means you cannot see the trout
taking the fly as well as you can the dry fly.

There are three ways to present an emerging nymph or pupa just under the surface. By just under,
we mean within a half-inch or less of the surface of the water.

The first method is to use a small strike indicator placed about eighteen inches above the fly. You
should cast the fly up and across the same as a dry fly, mending the line as necessary to get a
drag free drift with the indicator. If is doesn't drift drag free, then the fly isn't drifting drag free.
Watch the indicator carefully for any unusual movement that might indicate a fish taking the fly.
Take up slack line as necessary as the fly drift downstream.

The second method, a better method, is to use a dry fly instead of a strike indicator. Tie on the dry
fly as normal and add about eighteen inches of tippet to the bend in the hook of the dry using a
clinch knot. Cast and mend the two fly rig up and across just like you would using one dry fly and
watch the dry for any unusual movement that might indicate a take.


The third method, and the best one if done correctly, is to fish the emerging nymph or pupa just as
you would a dry fly. Watch the water carefully for any bulges or movement that might be a trout.
When the fly is quite a distance from you, or you are in low light conditions, you can watch the line
and leader for any unusual movement that might indicate a take. This method just takes more
concentration and practice, but it is better since there isn't an additional fly that may spook the fish.
Copyright 2012 James Marsh