03/15/11
Insects and other foods the trout may be eating:
1.    Blue-winged Olives
2  .  Sculpin, baitfish and small crayfish (Imitate with streamers)
3.    Little Brown Stoneflies
4.    Quill Gordons
5.    Blue Quills
6.    Little Black Caddis


Current Stream and Weather Conditions In The Smokies
The weather was warm and very nice yesterday. It felt rather strange wearing a
short sleeve shirt and looking at snow still remaining on Mount LeConte. That's
probably making it appear a little warmer than it really was but the change in the
weather is certainly welcome. I doubt there will be snow on the mountains by this
afternoon.

Little Pigeon River was still running high yesterday afternoon. It was full, near the
top of the banks in most areas. I think that particular watershed, along with the
Middle Prong of Little Pigeon, received a little more rain than some of the others. All
of them are falling fast.

The
Oconaluftee River watershed seems to be doing great and is at the 2.45 level.
The
Chataloochee Creek Data, which can be a little deceptive, appears in good
shape.
Little River is still just slightly on the high side at the 3.03 level but is wadable
in most areas if you use caution. The problem is the ground is saturated and it
wouldn't take a lot of rain to put them all on the high side again. We will just have to
wait and see what happens today and tonight.

The forecast for Thursday, Friday and Saturday is scary. It looks too good to be
true. We should have high temperatures in the seventies and lows in the high
forties. Hatches of aquatic insects will be going strong. I don't think the forecast  
could get any better for a little later on this week and this weekend. I hope all of you
have the opportunity to take advantage of the good weather.

The only concern is the amount of rain the current front is going to drop. I
still don't think it will be very much but it very well could be more than desirable. As
of now, at 5:30 AM in Pigeon Forge, it hasn't started raining. It seems like the last
several fronts have arrived about a half day slower than the NWS predicted. Maybe
they just use a cushion of time but it seems like rain is consistently arriving later
than they predict.

Down and Dirty  (some are clean) Tips and Recommendations for Fly
Fishing Destinations - Part 36
Just keep in mind that it is strictly one opinion that happens to be mine. The intent is to hopefully
give those interested a general idea of what to expect. Most likely every guide, affiliated business
entity and local angler will have a different opinion. These streams also have full coverage on our
Perfect Fly Stream Section.

Gibbon River Wyoming (Yellowstone National Park)
The Gibbon River is one of the popular trout streams in Yellowstone National Park
but one I think is fished less than it should be. There will be a period of time when
the season first gets underway good when the upper meadows, Norris Meadows
and Elk Park, will see some anglers but other than that, the Gibbon is not fished that
much. That isn't the case with Angie and I. We fish it the entire season and we have
caught lots of trout there during every month of the season. I think there's just so
many streams to choose from, both inside and outside of the park, that the Gibbon
is somewhat overlooked at times.

The fish don't average as large as they do in many streams but there's a lot of
them. There are some big browns in certain areas, especially in the lower meadows
during the Fall spawning run. The river, which is more like a big creek than a river,  
has just about type of water that trout live in. The water ranges from high gradient
fast, pocket water to long pools of slow moving water in its meadows.

I hate not giving the stream an "A" but I feel the access is a little too good with a
road running very near most of its water. That wouldn't be so bad if it were not in
Yellowstone National Park where the tourist's vehicles can be bumper to bumper at
times. Also, as I just mentioned, on the average the trout do run a little small. I will
give it a "A" minus.
Check out the Gibbon River.

2011 James Marsh